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Hepatovesicles

Hepatovesicles

Communi-cosomes” and Cellular Trafficking (Dr. Sukriti Baweja and Prof. Shiv Kumar Sarin): We have begun to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that coordinate the immune response to tissue damage and cell death in the liver. But, it is equally challenging to understand how do the cells communicate to each other and send signals across either for infection, inflammation or cell death. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have emerged as a novel messaging system of the organism, mediating cell–cell and inter-organ communication. In this regard, the area of focus is infection, inflammation and cellular death mediated by extracellular vesicles. The major highlights of work involves:

  • Extracellular Vesicles From Hepatitis B Patients Serve As Reservoir Of Hepatitis B Virus DNA and transmits the infection.
    Our recent published data (Dr. Sukriti and Dr. Ekta Gupta, JVH, 2019) showed that HBV DNA persists in EVs even though it is undetectable in plasma and such EVs are infectious and transmits the HBV DNA to uninfected hepatocytes. Clearly suggests that EVs are an alternative source of HBV DNA infection. This novel work is also accepted for the cover image of Journal of Viral Hepatitis.

  • Extracellular Vesicles from Sepsis patients fails to differentiate monocytes and arrests their mobility
    Plasma EVs from sepsis patients failed to differentiate healthy monocytes into macrophages, whereas healthy EVs clearly differentiated into M2 type macrophages and also the chemotaxis induced by sepsis EVs was abberated in comparison to healthy, suggesting that sepsis EVs cargo failed to mount effective immune response to circumvent infection.
  • Microvesicles predicts the response to steroid therapy and triggers inflammation in Severe alcoholic patients
    We also showed that pre-therapy plasma levels of CD34+ and ASGPR+ MVs are reliable non-invasive markers of steroid non-response and survival in patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis, which could pave way for EV, based new therapeutic strategies. (AP&T, 2018).

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